Workplace Concussion Discussion

Workplace Concussion Discussion


Workplace concussions should not be taken lightly. They’re serious brain injuries which should be reported to management, then reviewed by a doctor.

In this podcast, hear how a concussion is not just a brain bruise. Host Dan Clark describes what happens inside the head when a concussion occurs. Dan explains that even a slight hit to the head can cause brain injury.

Industries susceptible to concussions, and the procedure for reporting and medical review are also detailed.


TRANSCRIPT:

(:00)
intro music and effects

(:04)
Dan Clark: A concussion? It’s just a bruised brain, right? NO! It sounds like it’s time for a Workplace Concussion Discussion.

Hello, I’m Dan Clark of The Safety Brief, tackling health and safety hazards in today’s demanding industrial and construction worksites, a service of Creative Safety Supply.

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(:32)
Concussions are common injuries but they shouldn’t be taken lightly. Know how to identify a concussion and then report it!

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury, usually caused by a blow to the head. The brain bounces around or twists just a little bit in the skull, which can damage brain cells.

A concussion isn’t actually a bruise, as there’s no bleeding in the brain.

In the workplace, concussions are common in these jobs:

○ Construction
○ Firefighting
○ Police work
○ Delivery drivers
○ Warehouse and loading dock workers. And, of course, the list goes on.

(1:09)
Situations that bring on concussions are:

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○ Slips, trips and falls
○ Falling objects
○ Vehicle accidents

Workplace_Concussion_Discussion-Creative_Safety_Supply-550x208Symptoms can be many:

○ Blurry or double vision
○ Balance issues
○ Sensitivity to light and sound
○ Mood or behavior changes
○ A sudden desire to hear Nickelback. Oh. Somebody wrote that in there. That is not true.

But, symptoms do not always present themselves right away. Over time, some people develop headaches, fatigue and sleep problems. On the other hand, some people have no symptoms.

(1:43)
When there’s a blow to the head at work:
○ Report it to the boss right away.
○ The worker should see a doctor. Even when symptoms aren’t present, a concussion may have occurred.
○ Rest if told to rest. Time away from work may be necessary to recuperate.

And finally, here are some common-sense tips for preventing concussions:

○ Keep walking surfaces clear and dry
○ Provide handrails
○ Provide fall protection
○ Provide head protection

(2:13)
That’s all for this episode, Workplace Concussion Discussion. Come back for more ways to stay safety compliant in today’s ever-changing landscape of safety requirements. I’m Dan Clark of The Safety Brief, a service of Creative Safety Supply. Save 10% off your entire order at creativesafetysupply.com with coupon code BIG10.

(2:37)
END

Workplace concussion info from the CDC here.

image of worker-bricks-PixaBay-PDPics; hammer PixaBay-PublicDomainPictures

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