Temporary Wiring Is OK In Only 4 Situations

Temporary Wiring Is OK In Only 4 Situations

Temporary wiring (like an extension cord) gets the thumbs-up from OSHA in just four settings. In only a couple of minutes, Dan Clark lays out the details.

In this podcast, hear about OSHA’s temp wiring standard in workplace remodeling, experimentation, holiday lighting and emergencies.

We also list considerations when selecting and using extension cords and other flexible wiring.


TRANSCRIPT:

(:00)
intro music and effects

(:04)
Dan Clark: Sometimes you have to use temporary wiring such as extension cords to get the job done. BUT after work is completed you can get smacked down if the wiring is still in use. OSHA says temporary wiring is OK in only four situations. We’ll cover them next.

Hi, I’m Dan Clark with The Safety Brief. We take on health and safety hazards in today’s demanding industrial and construction worksites, a service of Creative Safety Supply. Save 10 percent off your entire order at creativesafetysupply.com with coupon code BIG10.

(:38)
Temporary wiring should never be a long-term electrical solution. OSHA commonly cites companies for using flexible cords instead of permanent wiring. In particular, a business can be written up for running cords through doorways and windows or attaching them to surfaces.

WHEN IS TEMPORARY WIRING OK?

According to OSHA standard 1910.305, temporary wiring and lighting of 600 V or less is OK in these four situations:

(1:09)

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1. During remodeling, maintenance or repair of buildings.

2. Decorative purposes such as holidays, carnivals and more, but not to stretch beyond 90 days.

3. Experimental or development work.

4. During emergencies.

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Oh, by the way, in all of these cases the temporary wiring must be removed before the project is wrapped up.

(1:32)
When temporary wiring is used:

• Choose cords and power connectors approved by a testing lab recognized by OSHA. For example, UL —Underwriters Laboratories. And beware of counterfeit labels. Make sure to buy from a reputable dealer. Check for recalls with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

• Avoid plugging devices with three prong plugs into extension cords with two pronged outlets.

• Use light duty extension cords for powering just one item at a time.

(2:02)
• If outdoors, pick a cord for outdoor use.

• Temporary wiring should never run through water or snow.

• Temporary wiring should never run through walls, windows, doors or ceilings.

That’s all for this episode, Temporary Wiring Is OK In Only 4 Situations. Join me again for more ways to stay safety compliant in today’s always-changing landscape of safety requirements. I’m Dan Clark of The Safety Brief, a service of Creative Safety Supply. Save 10 percent off your entire order at creativesafetysupply.com with coupon code BIG10.

(2:39)
END

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