The Safety Brief

The Safety Brief is a compilation of short podcasts produced by Creative Safety Supply and Dan Clark, our resident all-around safety guru. In our podcasts we give short but valuable overviews and insights into how contractors and safety managers can be even more effective in protecting their workers.

Falling Object Risks

Falling Object Risks

Falling object hazards can be hidden in plain sight. They’re a threat in many businesses, not just warehouses or construction. In this Safety Brief, we detail three risk reduction steps to help eliminate injury from falling objects. #1. Operations assessment. Do a general inspection of your facility

. #2. Review departments, people and their positions, and

Safety Hazard Reporting At Work 

Safety Hazard Reporting At Work 

It’s a myth! It’s a myth that employees are bad at hazard reporting. They are actually good safety observers. Having a diversity of watchful eyes—including regular workers—increases workplace safety. A safety observer program is critical in getting widespread employee involvement to reduce injuries. Company managers can start their own, or follow OSHA’s “VPP,” the Voluntary

Color Coding For Safety

Color Coding For Safety

This is a surprise! OSHA does NOT have requirements for safety color coding in the workplace. But ANSI does. The American National Standards Institute suggests labeling areas with seven colors for safety or organizational categories. Use the same color scheme throughout your facility, using only a few colors. Consistency and simplicity make it easier for

Loose Clothing Hazards

Loose Clothing Hazards

Keep clothing tucked and tight! If not, workers could be pulled into a machine. Baggy pants, neck ties and untied shoe laces are just a few examples of loose clothing hazards in the workplace. Untucked shirts, unzipped jackets and other flapping items may be drawn in to belts, shafts, gears, pulleys, chains, or other rotating,

Ladder Safety At Work

Ladder Safety At Work

They are so familiar, workers ignore ladder safety. Misuse accounts for tens of thousands of at-work accidents, and 100 deaths or more annually in the U.S. Here we review the two types of ladders, freestanding and self-supporting, and how employees can be safe using each. Even though staffers may balk at ladder training, they should

Stop Lower Back Injuries

Stop Lower Back Injuries

One million people have back injuries in the workplace every year, according to OSHA. And most of those injuries are from lifting below the knees or over the shoulders. Storage of materials above 1.5 ft and below 5 ft could reduce risk. A kaizen event with 5S sorting would be a good way to achieve

CPR & AED Trained Workers

CPR & AED Trained Workers

People will be safer at work, and companies could have lower insurance premiums if employees know CPR & AED operation. Training is recommended for at least some workers, across all shifts and departments. CPR, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is performed on someone whose heart has stopped. 100 chest compressions per minute, about the tempo of the Bee

Stop Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Stop Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

It’s a killer you can’t see, taste or smell. Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen due to gas powered tools running in a confined space. But with common sense precautions, workers can stay safe. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the invisible gas given off from burning fossil and wood fuels. Even in small concentrations, it reduces oxygen

3 Simple Tips For Safety Managers

3 Simple Tips For Safety Managers

Safety managers, ATTENTION! Check hazards, provide safety training, and ensure proper use of PPE. Safety managers will best succeed by planning ahead for dangers such as fire, chemicals, slips and falls, and other sources of potential on-site injury. Proper safety instruction for workers and managers is critical. When hazards are identified, all people on-site should

Safety Housekeeping

Safety Housekeeping

This is the story of tragedy that could have been avoided with better safety housekeeping. Here, we detail a fatal accident at a sugar refinery in Wyoming, and review of the OSHA citations. A Gemba walk by managers, or a safety inspection by employees, could have identified the easily-resolved problems. Safety housekeeping is absolutely essential.

Facility Safety – 10 FAQs

Facility Safety – 10 FAQs

Dan has compiled the 10 most common signage and labeling questions asked about keeping workers safe and avoiding fines. These questions are from a wide range of industries. The answers are a good starting resource for any professional concerned about facility safety. The size of signs. The colors of signs. OSHA compliance. NFPA vs. GHS.

Eyewash Station Requirements

Eyewash Station Requirements

An eyewash station is something you may need, but hope you will never use. But if there’s an emergency, it’s there to flush out the eyes fast to prevent injury or blindness. If you have hazardous substances, you may be OSHA-required to provide eyewash stations. Larger facilities may need more than one. Provide employees with

Safety Recognition Programs

Safety Recognition Programs

Safety recognition programs for employees, implemented correctly, can be successful in reducing injuries and saving money. But, if executed poorly, can do more harm than good. Employees may try to rig the system to get a reward for better safety reports. Some workers will work slower to increase safety. Also, if managers and owners are

Universal Safety Standards

Universal Safety Standards

Will universal safety standards cause more problems than they solve? Implementing rules across cultures and languages will have benefits, but also potential issues. GHS, the Globally Harmonized System of labeling hazardous chemicals is one example of standardized visual warnings being adopted worldwide. The United Nations began planning the program in 1992, and hoped to have

5S Red Tags

5S Red Tags

Increase efficiency by red-tagging items you don’t need immediately. Store them or get rid of them. Red tagging is part of “Sort”, one of the five elements of a Japanese system of streamlining manufacturing called 5S. The five elements of 5S are Sort, Set In Order, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain. If you’re eager to improve

Foot Protection

Foot Protection

Helmets, ear protection, eye protection are all important. However, safety managers must ensure foot protection is a priority too. The foot is susceptible to many dangers at a jobsite. OHSA warns of punctures, crushing, sprains, slips, trips and falls. Feet can also be injured from electrocution, chemical burns and frostbite. Shoes or boots that offer

Mine Safety

Mine Safety

Mining companies and miners must always be involved with mine safety. The past few generations of miners have had many safety improvements, but more are needed. Companies and miners should prevent cave-ins with proper ground control, including pillar design, roof supports and horizontal stress supports. Confined space fire and explosions can be minimized by keeping

Summer Workplace Hazards

Summer Workplace Hazards

Summer brings a new set of workplace hazards. Workers will be affected by heat and humidity, in and out of the sun. Plan ahead in the spring for hot weather supplies and facility adaptation. Ventilation and liquids are important to keep employees cool and hydrated. Beware of insects and animals, which are both very active

Reducing Workplace Injuries

Reducing Workplace Injuries

ALL injuries equal, or add up to, a loss of money for every company. And imagine how much money. The U.S. Centers For Disease Control And Prevention says there are 3.6 million work-related injuries treated in emergency rooms each year. These kind of stats point towards the job (no pun intended) that employers have in

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